Wellness

Recipe from our chefs: Roasted tomato gazpacho

This gazpacho recipe is summer in a bowl: light and loaded with nutrient-rich produce, but surprisingly rich and satisfying.

This roasted tomato gazpacho recipe comes from the chefs of Nutrition Services at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, and it’s the perfect cool dish for hot days, featuring a caramelizing flavor courtesy of summer’s already-tasty tomatoes.

It's light and loaded with nutrient-rich produce, but you'll be surprised by how rich and satisfying it tastes.

Our chefs suggest serving one of summer’s greatest soups with some tapas — think olives, cheese, a bit of chorizo sausage and some crusty, whole-grain bread.

Watch this recipe come to life in a quick video, or find the full instructions below. It's one of those recipes that doesn't require precise measurement for the seasonings – just add a shake or pinch until it tastes good.

Recipe ingredients:

  • 8 Roma tomatoes
  • olive oil for roasting
  • 16 ounces of tomato juice — look for a low-salt variety or blend up tomatoes on your own
  • 8 ounces of mixed vegetable juice, such as V8
  • 1 cucumber, peeled and sliced
  • 1 teaspoon of cumin
  • 1 clove of garlic, finely chopped
  • onion, diced
  • juice from 1 lemon
  • cayenne pepper, to taste
  • hot pepper sauce, to taste
  • Worcestershire sauce, a few dashes to taste
  • salt and black pepper, to taste
  • chopped cilantro
  • limes

Recipe steps:

  1. Cut the tomatoes in half and drizzle with olive oil and salt and pepper on a baking sheet. Our chefs like the Roma variety because they're a little meatier.
  2. Roast at 250 degrees for one hour.
  3. Chill tomatoes.
  4. Add all ingredients to a food processor, including any drippings from the tomatoes. Try peeling the cucumber beforehand to avoid the bitterness from its skin.
  5. Puree for about two minutes, until large chunks for garlic and onion are blended in.
  6. Chill for about two hours before serving. Sprinkle with cilantro and lime juice.

Health pro tip: We recommend keeping a mix of two parts kosher salt and one part cracked black pepper in jar. When you can add a pinch of seasoning and feel how much you're adding, you'll be less likely to over-salt your food.

Nutrition Services at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center offers nutrition counseling, classes and more for patients and the community

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